Broader Shoulders

by Rebbetzin Malkah

The Hebrew word for adaptable is sagil.

How can we be adaptable? What is the way toward accepting change, wanted or unwanted, and new ideas, or toward freshening up our daily walk?

Adaptability is a state of mind. In order to be adaptable, we have to be open to change. We have to realize that only Hashem is unchanging. We are creatures of continuous growth and learning. When we accept that we are not at the end of the road, we might be up for stopping off on the side of the road to experience new growth and opportunities. Perhaps you are currently in the midst of change and it was not of your own choice; you understand the resistance you are putting forth and the frustration you are feeling. If you need help with adapting to change and don't know how, practice this meditation below to open up your neshama (soul).

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Bottled Up Kindness

by Rabbi Jason

'The kindnesses of the Lord I shall sing forever; to generation after generation I shall make known Your faithfulness, with my mouth. For I said, "Forever will it be built with kindness; as the heavens, with which You will establish Your faithfulness."' -- Psalms 89:2-3

The lessons of kindness coming from the scriptures are as boundless as the kindness Hashem used when He formed Creation. The midrash teaches us that the Torah begins with kindness (the clothing of Adam and Eve) and ends with kindness (the burial of Moses). It seems that chesed is a fundamental force of the universe.

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Pinchas - Seize A Lifetime, Reach for the Infinite

by Rebbetzin Malkah

We all have met one.  One who is crying out in the wilderness, trying to get our attention to change our ways and show us that everything we are doing is totally wrong.  We usually listen the first time, and then let their words take flight on the wind.  Why?  Their words eat at our very core and draw lines of division between us and "them."  Who are these voices?  They are the zealots of every religious institution - the ones who seek to get to the heart of the very evil in their midst (which is all of us).

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Parashat Bo - This Month Shall Be Unto You...

Boby Rebbetzin Malkah

In the world in which we live today, grandeur and wealth continue to be a means to power and influence. Despite this trend throughout history, it is important for us to recall a time when one person, and then a nation, made a remarkable transformation in a time akin to today. We see Moshe unravel the greatest illusion and break through the arrogance of a leader whose kingdom was built on the sand. We also see our people receive the first mitzvah, the key for a return journey, which would not only bring redemption, but lead them on the path back to Gan Eden.

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Re'eh - Be Warm-Hearted and Openhanded

 by Rebbetzin Malkah

(this commentary was written in response to hurricane Katrina.)

As we continue through Devarim, we see the bulk of the commandments are revisited again in this week's Parashat R'eh.  The parasha begins by presenting the choice to follow the mitzvot and receive blessing.  If we should choose not to, we are left open to the negative consequences.  Given that the concept of blessing is presented to us first, there is no mistaking the way in which Hashem wishes us to be motivated. The Children of Yisrael have the incredible option to "have it all" and be the winners of a physically and spiritually rich land - all by simply adhering to the mitzvot laid out by Moshe.

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Behar - To Infinity and Back


by Rebbetzin Malkah

Infinity.  Philosophers, mathematicians, physicists and theologians have tried for centuries to wrap their minds around this idea.  Symbolically represented as  , the definition of infinity is "unboundedness", or something without end.  In Hebrew, it is called Ain Sof and has been the topic of many rabbinical discourses - all in reference to the Holy One.  What is it about infinity, or ain sof, that captivates us? And how is it that mathematicians are able to pull this symbol into equations of relevance?  How is it they and countless others harness this concept, dance with it, and return with something tangible? Whether we realize it or not, the Torah addresses this exact dance through Bris Milah, the Yoveil (Jubilee year), Shemini Atzeret, Chanukah, and the counting of the Omer into Shavuot.  Through these special times, we experience what humans have been driving towards since the dawn of time: a taste of the Divine as we slip into the intangible, sublime realm of infinity and back.

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Vayiggash - The Harvester and the Plower

by Rebbetzin Malkah

This week we witness a momentous reunion of two brothers, Joseph and Judah.  Judah boldly pleads for the life of Benjamin and the sake of his father's well-being. Through this event, we witness not only redemption and restoration for that moment in time, but a prophetic vision of the future for all Jewry through the traits and attributes of these two men.

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